{{Article.Title}}

{{Article.SubTitle}}

By {{Article.AuthorName}} | {{Article.PublicationDate.slice(6, -2) | date:'EEEE, MMMM d, y'}}
{{TotalFavorites}} Favorite{{TotalFavorites>1? 's' : ''}}
{{Article.Caption}}

Across the construction industry, COVID-19’s impact has caused a range of problems for contractors and projects—prolonged or intermittent work shutdowns, supply chain delays, pricing increases on materials and funding shortfalls. It has also led to court closures. The legal backlog for claims and disputes means that owners and contractors are facing the option of waiting until the courts are functioning the way they were previously or utilizing alternative approaches to resolution to keep projects and businesses running. 

Though courts across the country reopened to some extent in the latter half of 2020, many state and federal facilities were shut down or working with a limited capability for weeks or months. The closures not only froze the progress of numerous disputes already underway, but caused new schedule, cost and COVID-19-related claims to also be held up in the same backlog that is slowly being addressed under current restricted operations. New safety measures to reduce viral transmission, including reduced usage of courtrooms, restrictions on personnel and increased cleaning and sanitizing measures, have limited the number of cases courts can handle on a daily basis and lengthened legal timelines in ways many parties had not anticipated and cannot afford. 

That many small businesses have continued to struggle financially through the pandemic period further complicates payments and work completions on projects that have been disrupted. Before filing or proceeding with a claim, contractors and construction owners will have to take a harder look at the significance of the claim they’re filing, the likelihood of success and potential for recovery, and the added risks of prolonged litigation. These deliberations are certainly familiar, but their potential outcomes take on a greater significance now. Having to wait longer for discovery and a trial to occur, for a judge to rule on motions or to decide a case, could ultimately determine whether moving forward with litigation should even be considered versus reaching an alternative settlement. 

With parties on all sides looking to recoup the lost time and cost from the pandemic, as well as resolving their prolonged matters in dispute, some parties may opt to instead settle more quickly and for less money. Though nonbinding, dispute resolution options like mediation can offer the chance to reach an agreement without going through arbitration or litigation. After both sides select a neutral mediator or review board, schedule time and prepare statements, they may be able to come to an agreement based on the mediator’s determination. On the other hand, if not satisfied with the nonbinding decision, the matter can still be re-mediated and/or litigated. It’s important to note that while this process is typically quicker than legally binding routes, it is not an overnight answer to resolution either. 

The best option to resolve each project’s disputes will vary as there’s still a lot of uncertainty in the pandemic environment, including how it is impacting options for construction litigation. For better or worse, these delays have already altered how contractors and owners approach contracts and cases. No one yet knows what the new normal looks like, what expectations should be about legal timelines and costs due to the limited operations of the court system, but parties should expect to face similar extended circumstances regarding claims and disputes for the foreseeable future and be prepared to adapt. 

Print

 Comments ({{Comments.length}})

  • {{comment.Name}}

    {{comment.Text}}

    {{comment.DateCreated.slice(6, -2) | date: 'MMM d, y h:mm:ss a'}}

Leave a comment

Required!
Required! Not valid email!
Required!