Posts Tagged 'Politics'

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with 'Politics'. If you still can't find what you are looking for, try using the search box.

A Capitol Hill and State Legislative Update

During his campaign for the presidency, one of Donald Trump’s key initiatives was a $1 trillion 10-year infrastructure spending package with funding from private investors and the federal government. Specifically, financing from private investments would secure public-private partnership (P3s) agreements to help address the nation’s infrastructure problems.

President Trump recently has moved away from P3s by questioning their effectiveness, and the administration’s focus for the remainder of 2017 will be on tax reform. As such, all signs seem to point to the unveiling of an infrastructure plan in early 2018. 

Gauging the Swing of the Republican Pendulum

As suddenly as the window of opportunity blew open for Republicans by the winds of change last November with the election of President Trump, some fear that a string of GOP congressional special elections are evidence—although limited in nature—that the party’s opportunity to enact its agenda may be winnowing already, if not positioning itself to slam shut. 

Republicans not only have control over both Houses of Congress in Washington, but also have control of 34 governor’s mansions—up from 31 in 2016 and the high-water mark since President Warren G. Harding used a radio for the first time in the White House (and only four shy of the threshold to amend the Constitution on a party-line vote). 

The Power of the Congressional Review Act

For more than a decade, it was common for elected officials on Capitol Hill to say, “the Congressional Review Act (CRA) has only ever been successful once.” However, under the Trump administration, the rarely used CRA has successfully overturned eight overreaching Obama-era regulations. Passed in 1996, the CRA allows new regulations to be overturned by Congress through a joint resolution of disapproval.

What Merit Shop Contractors Should Expect From the Trump Administration

While controversies over the first nominee for Secretary of Labor slowed implementation of the Trump administration’s labor agenda during the first 100 days of the president’s term, construction industry leaders are already seeing a sharp contrast with the anti-business agenda of the Obama administration, as federal labor agencies have begun to review and in some cases retract burdensome regulations imposed by previous officials. 

State-Level GOP Dominance Yields Advancements in Pro-Merit Shop Policies

Throughout the remarkable 2016 election cycle, the political media generated impressive ratings by bombarding voters with sensational and hyper-focused coverage of the contentious and divisive race for the White House and a handful of competitive U.S. Senate races. After the dust settled and voters elected a GOP-controlled Congress and White House, it became clear the media failed to give enough attention to one of the most important storylines in American politics: the GOP’s domination of Democrats in state government. 

State government policy is likely to impact America’s voters, businesses and the economy as much—or more than—anything coming out of Washington in 2017.  

The GOP now controls the most legislative seats since the founding of the party—helping to advance free enterprise-focused policies supported by Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC) and the merit shop contracting community. 

Congress, States Consider Legislation to Prevent PLA Mandates

On March 14, Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) introduced the Fair and Open Competition Act (S. 622) to prevent federal agencies and recipients of federal funding from requiring contractors to sign controversial project labor agreements (PLAs) as a condition of winning federal or federally assisted construction contracts. Rep. Dennis Ross (R-Fla.) introduced a companion bill (H.R. 1552) in the U.S. House of Representatives that was reported favorably out of committee March 28.

Dissecting the House Tax Blueprint

In June 2016, as part of Speaker Paul Ryan’s “Better Way” initiative, the House Ways and Means Committee rolled out its “Blueprint” for tax reform. This broad overview outlined Republicans’ talking points for the campaign trail and the anticipated showdown with the Clinton White House, if not a Democratic Senate majority. 

After a false start with the ill-fated Camp Draft, expectations were tempered for legislative action. The topline items read as a veritable wish list of pro-growth provisions that were hailed by tax coalitions and trade groups alike. The tradeoffs were largely ignored, with any prospective pushback muted by dismal electoral expectations. After an initial burst of coverage, the Blueprint receded as Congress left town, leaving all eyes trained on an increasingly surreal presidential race. 

Legislation Introduced To Repeal Davis-Bacon Act

Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa) has introduced legislation, H.R. 743, in the U.S. House of Representatives to repeal the prevailing wage requirements of the Davis-Bacon Act. The bill now awaits passage by the House Committee on Education and the Workforce.

ABC has long supported full repeal of the archaic 85-year old Davis-Bacon Act. The prevailing wages from the law are administered through an unscientific and fundamentally flawed survey process by the U.S. Department of Labor, and the Congressional Budget Office has estimated that the Davis-Bacon Act will raise federal construction costs by $13 billion between 2018 and 2026. 

Congress Votes to Permanently Block ‘Blacklisting’ Rule

Congress has passed legislation (H.J. Res. 37) that will block implementation of the Obama administration’s Fair Pay and Safe Workplaces Executive Order 13673, commonly referred to as “blacklisting,” through the Congressional Review Act. The House approved H.J. Res. 37 with a bipartisan vote of 236-187 and the Senate passed the measure by a vote of 49-48.

Advocacy Opportunity: Bring Lawmakers Onsite

The beginning of the 115th Congress presents a valuable opportunity for members of Associated Builders and Contractors to participate in grassroots advocacy efforts and make their voices heard by lawmakers on Capitol Hill. One way construction businesses can do this is by hosting a lawmaker at a jobsite or training facility in their community.

Pages: Previous1234NextReturn Top
//to add proper spacing in between panes
 

Industry Changes Push AEC Firms Toward Proactive Recruitment
When it comes to recruitment, the AEC industry is grappling with an already...

Gauging the Swing of the Republican Pendulum
As suddenly as the window of opportunity blew open for Republicans by the winds...

Q: What does it mean for your company to be employee-owned?
Employee ownership allows Choate to share long-term success with our employees...

Service Above Self
Two years ago, Gary Neal—an engineer and project manager with MEC Contractors...

View this month's Digital Edition
Construction Executive
Print magazine published 10 times per year covering news, market developments and business issues impacting the construction industry 

eNewsletters:
Managing Your Business
Biweekly eNewsletter covering management and financial best practices

Tech Trends
Biweekly eNewsletter covering the latest construction technology trends and products

Risk Management
Biweekly eNewsletter covering surety bonding, insurance, safety and compliance.