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Building a Relationship-Based Career

  When Brooke Wenger started at Triad Engineering, Inc., Hagerstown, Md., as a marketing coordinator nearly a decade ago, she was terrified of going to networking events. She let nerves and the fear of not knowing anyone get to her, not to mention the idea of having to talk in front of a crowd. 

Today, as Triad Engineering’s more seasoned director of business development, Wenger spends the vast majority of her time out of the office attending meetings and events, serving on committees, following up on project leads and building relationships with potential business partners.

Equip Construction Managers to Minimize Safety Risks

  Construction managers help shoulder the responsibility of safety, ensuring the appropriate measures have been integrated into all aspects of the construction process while combatting the pressures of time, labor, cost, scope and quality. With the advent of new technologies, in addition to the right partners and resources, construction managers are more equipped than ever to tackle safety and minimize risk exposure.

Advocacy Opportunity: Bring Lawmakers Onsite

  The beginning of the 115th Congress presents a valuable opportunity for members of Associated Builders and Contractors to participate in grassroots advocacy efforts and make their voices heard by lawmakers on Capitol Hill. One way construction businesses can do this is by hosting a lawmaker at a jobsite or training facility in their community.

Heartfelt Giving at Its Finest

As a member of the Jacksonville Beach, Fla., community for the past 11 years, FaverGray does more than build award-winning student housing, apartment, senior living and hospitality projects. It gives back to local nonprofits in a heartfelt way—one of the reasons the company has earned Associated Builders and Contractors’ Accredited Quality Contractor designation. 

2017 Tech Predictions

  When Star Trek™ debuted 50 years ago, who would have thought the technology employed on the Starship Enterprise would one day be used on construction jobsites. Crew members carried a communicator, which looked much like yesterday’s flip phones. The Combadge was a wearable communication device, and Lt. Uhura wore a wireless Bluetooth-like earpiece. When Captain Kirk asked a question or gave a command, the computer responded remarkably like Apple’s Siri or Amazon’s Alexa. The Replicator produced food, tools and other objects, much like today’s 3-D printers. The ship was a model of operational efficiency many construction firms strive to achieve.

A Diverse Workforce, Built on Merit

In this spotlight on entrepreneurship and diversity, Construction Executive interviewed industry leader Larry Lopez, president and CEO of Green JobWorks, a Baltimore-based staffing company that provides both skilled and general labor to clients in Maryland, Washington, D.C., and Virginia. As the new chair of Associated Builders and Contractors’ (ABC) Diversity Committee, Lopez imparts his wisdom on what it means to be a minority business owner in a rapidly changing industry, and the path he envisions for small and emerging contractors to succeed. 

Rigging Supplies: New Model Speeds Delivery and Selection

Frequently, purchasing rigging equipment is left to the last minute, either because it is an afterthought or because it is unclear what specifications the rigging requires for the job. To help make construction professionals more competitive, proactive rigging suppliers are offering a more responsive purchasing model. 

Mitigate Risk by Managing Information

Modern building and infrastructure projects generate a lot of data, and it’s only going to keep growing. In 2004, a large project generated roughly 100 gigabytes of data; today, that stat has risen to 6.5 terabytes of data. Because building and infrastructure projects live and die by project information, many risks are associated with properly managing it. 

Rethinking Health Care Construction

Outpatient and walk-in urgent care facilities are far less costly for organizations to construct than larger medical buildings and hospitals; therefore, these facilities are popping up in retail spaces and are most likely on short-term leases that do not require a large commitment from the organization. The increase in the number of outpatient facilities also reverts back to patient satisfaction: Patients are more comfortable seeing their doctors at an outpatient facility. 

Pave It Forward

In September, The PHILLIPS School in Annandale, Va., debuted $150,000 worth of repairs to its entrance, bus lanes and sidewalks as a result of the Heavy Construction Contractors Association’s annual “Pave It Forward!” charitable giving program.
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